Teaser Tuesday: Er Ist Wieder Da

Last week I made a prediction:

School is now in full swing; I suppose my 1-book lead on my Goodreads Reading Challenge won’t last long.

As I type this, Goodreads says I’m “On Track” so I my lead is gone but I also haven’t fallen behind . . . yet.

As my students get back into the school routine and as I try to schedule dedicated blogging and reading time, the Wheel of Time has come full circle to

Teaser TuesdayJust in case you don’t know, Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by A Daily Rhythm. Anyone can play along! All you have to do is grab the book you’re currently reading, open to a random page and share a few sentences from that page. But make sure you don’t share any spoilers!*

*I wish I could take credit for this introduction, but I shamelessly stole it from Heather over at bitsnbooks. To help me make amends, you should go check out her blog.

This week I’m reading Er Ist Wieder Da (English Title: Look Who’s Back) by Timur Vermes.

This book requires a bit of explanation:

Berlin, Summer 2011. Adolf Hitler wakes up on a patch of open ground, alive and well. Things have changed – no Eva Braun, no Nazi party, no war. Hitler barely recognises his beloved Fatherland, filled with immigrants and run by a woman.

People certainly recognise him, albeit as a flawless impersonator who refuses to break character. The unthinkable, the inevitable happens, and the ranting Hitler goes viral, becomes a YouTube star, gets his own T.V. show, and people begin to listen. But the Führer has another programme with even greater ambition – to set the country he finds a shambles back to rights.

The Truly Random Number Generator sends us to page 243:

»Wir halten also Fest«, sagt ich weiter, »der 
Judenhund ist unter den Hunden zu suchen. Das 
weitere Vorgehen ist naheliegend: Wir müssen 
nach einem kriecherischen Hund Ausschau halten, 
einschmeichelnd, einspeichelnd, aber jederzeit zum 
feigen Angriff aus dem Hinterhalt in der Lage - 
es ist selbstverstaendlich der Dackel.«
 
Approximate English Translation:
 
"So we keep strong," I continued, "the Jewish dog 
looks at the other dogs. The way forward is 
obvious: we must look out for insinuating, 
ingratiating, cowardly dogs, ready at any time for a 
cowardly attack - an ambush from any location - 
every night, we are the dachshund." 

Some notes:

I’m reading this in German, but it’s been a while since I’ve read anything in German, so my translation isn’t quite accurate. Hence, I’m unsure of the exact translation of einspeichelnd.

The last phrase probably refers to the original purpose of the dachshund: hunting and catching varmints.

Native German speakers and readers, feel free to correct my rough and probable crude, inaccurate translation.

Er Ist Wieder Da cover

In Retrospect

I’m just finished reading July 1914: Countdown to War by Sam McMeekin; I gave it 3 stars – mainly because the last 80 pages or so just dragged on and on and on and on. The last three pages, though, were excellent and saved the book from a 2-star review.

Now I can start serious reading of  Chaucer’s Tale: 1386 and the Road to Canterbury by Paul Strohm.

 


 

What have you been reading?

 


 

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2 thoughts on “Teaser Tuesday: Er Ist Wieder Da

  1. Although this is fiction, a part of me wonders if something like what the Hitler character wants to do isn’t a real possibility of happening again–maybe not the same targeted population, but a similar dynamic. It’s scary to think about.

    Thank you for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Heya,

    I think you made a few mistakes:

    »Wir halten also Fest«, means something like “we adhere/retain”, i. e. stating a fact.

    “der Judenhund ist unter den Hunden zu suchen” –> the jeswish dog will be found among the (other) dogs. “etwas ist … zu suchen” means something like “if you look for X, you should be searching for it at Y”

    “einspeichelnd” means something like drooling. Speichel = Saliva.

    “every night, we are the dachshund.” 😀 This is quite a funny description, but the whole passage would translate to something like “we have to look for a servile dog, insinuating, drooling, but always ready to cowardly attack from an ambush – and of course it is the dachshund.”

    The language is quite crooked in this hitler-style speech patterns, and uses a lot of passive sentences and strange words – so I think it’s quite hard to understand/translate.

    Okay, I hope this was helpful and I did not make too much mistakes myself 😉

    (I did not read the book itself, but I hope you enjoy it)

    greetings from Hamburg,
    Lena

    Liked by 1 person

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